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Poster: light into ashes Date: Feb 20, 2011 11:09pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Newly uploaded interview, dated 10/22/71

Link, please.

Pertaining to nothing, here's a couple newspaper reviews of the Dead's 11/27/70 Chicago show (now lost, of course).

"It was Friday night in the Syndrome, a time when students were home for the holiday and a place which has become a 'scene'.
But the Dead didn't draw a crowd on leave from school and looking for a place to go. They never have.
Ever since they came out of San Francisco in 1968, their fans have been small in number, intensely behind them and into their music. When the Dead come to town, it's like a statesman returning to his people, a big family reunion...
The crowd stood when Garcia and the Riders entered, and they never sat down. From then on, it was 5 1/2 hours of tapping, clapping and shaking..."

"It was a religious experience...with Pigpen presiding as high priest... The Dead's show was more of a religious happening than a concert. The group's fans started dancing and shouting from the first chords of Casey Jones, and didn't slow down until the final shouts from Pigpen on Turn On Your Lovelight, which one person aptly described as 'the closest possible thing to nirvana.' The Dead's 'congregation,' nearly 6000 strong for the show, freaked and frolicked for four hours to music by...easily the most underrated rock band in the world."

"Their music exemplifies the highs of psychedelic rock. It builds to a peak, spreads out in all directions, comes back into focus and begins again, driving harder and reaching higher. It runs the gamut from acid-head lyrics to workingman's lyrics, from classically structured songs to country-folk-rock, but ultimately the Dead merge song after song into one song, transcending each style and each influence and containing them all in the Dead's own kind of hypnotic, high-energy rock & roll."

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Poster: duckpond74 Date: Feb 21, 2011 11:59am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Newly uploaded interview, dated 10/22/71

Thanks for posting these. Lia, I always appreciate your research and write-ups on these 'missing grails'. Do you happen to know the sources? I'm curious if these came from the major dailies or the weekly 'underground' press like 'The Seed'.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Feb 21, 2011 1:01pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Newly uploaded interview, dated 10/22/71

Actually I just got them from the 11/27/70 entry on thejerrysite (which, in turn, featured them only because the reviews also mentioned the New Riders). The reviews came from Billboard and the Chicago Daily News, I think.

There should be a website that collects all the newspaper reviews of old Dead shows. But alas, there isn't.

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 21, 2011 7:19am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Newly uploaded interview, dated 10/22/71

Neat clips. What's particularly striking to me is, first, how much of the Dead experience was already so well set at that time; and second, how it was clearly seen by these reviewers as different and distinct from other shows/musical experiences. After all, this was 1970 -- a time when there was certainly no lack of great music or bands to be enthusiastic about! But clearly, it was already a well-understood "given" that the Dead and their fans were different. (And not because of 60s nostalgia, LOL.)

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Poster: Jack o' Roses Date: Feb 21, 2011 9:33pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Newly uploaded interview, dated 10/22/71

"When the Dead come to town, it's like a statesman returning to his people, a big family reunion... "
Some things never change
OR
I love my family!

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Poster: billydlions Date: Feb 21, 2011 5:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Newly uploaded interview, dated 10/22/71

http://bt.etree.org/details.php?id=542618

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Feb 21, 2011 12:52pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Newly uploaded interview, dated 10/22/71

Thanks.

This interview is unquestionably 1970. The interviewer refers to Altamont as a semi-recent event, and his questions about the political scene in California sound much more like 1970-style questions to me.
More importantly, he refers to Live Dead as "the" live Dead album (no reference to the live album released in Sept '71), and at one point he mistakes the Dead's new album American Beauty (released Nov '70) with Dylan's New Morning (released Oct '70).

Anyway...this is a rather dispiriting interview, since the Dead are clearly uninterested and not getting along with the interviewer. They manage to deflect most of his questions - I think he does more talking than they do! (They also sound very tired, probably just because the tape's slowed down.) Of course he tries asking them lots of questions about politics & society that they don't want to answer (but what did they expect, appearing on a program called "Underground News"?). Towards the end, Jerry even denies that there was any change in the band between Live Dead & Workingman's Dead! "That couldn't possibly matter....it's all music."

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Poster: sraileus Date: Feb 21, 2011 2:33pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Newly uploaded interview, dated 10/22/71

Great, glad to see that you agree! Thanks for your analysis, and 1970 it is.